Our Difference

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Offices in NSW, VIC, QLD & WA

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5+ in-house Trustees in Bankruptcy

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Over 110 staff

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Established in 1984

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Long-term relationships with lawyers and accountants

15 in house liquid

15+ in-house Liquidators and Administrators

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ASIC registered + ARITA memberships in-house

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We operate in all states and territories across Australia

Call us now on 1300 788 788 for IMMEDIATE solutions for your business.

Offices open 8am-8pm AEST

Call us now on 1300 788 788 for IMMEDIATE solutions for your business.

Offices open 8am-8pm AEST

Free Consultation

The first positive step forward is taking control of your situation so you can regain control of your business

Many companies can offer you voluntary administration assistance, but without the experience that we have. Corporate Guardian has helped hundreds of business owners breath a sigh of relief that they have taken control of their destiny. We’ll be with you all the way as you put the worst behind you and begin to make future plans.

“Should I appoint a Voluntary Administrator?”

If you’re the director, voluntary administration is a process that can potentially relieve you of your debts so you can continue trading.

Corporate Guardian will appoint an Voluntary Administrator who will arrange a proposal to creditors for payment of your company’s debts.

Are you looking for a way to save your company?

Don’t ignore your company debts. Doing nothing and hoping you can trade out of your current financial situation is not worth the risk.

Corporate Guardian can guarantee you that when you go into voluntary administration, we have the experience and expertise to make this process stress free and as seamless as possible. Our team of in-house advisors, lawyers and insolvency practitioners have dealt with many similar circumstances and will provide you with the support you need through this time.

The first positive step forward is taking control of your situation so you can regain control of your business

Many companies can offer you voluntary administration assistance, but without the experience that we have. Corporate Guardian has helped hundreds of business owners breath a sigh of relief that they have taken control of their destiny. We’ll be with you all the way as you put the worst behind you and begin to make future plans.

“Should I appoint a Voluntary Administrator?”

If you’re the director, voluntary administration is a process that can potentially relieve you of your debts so you can continue trading.

Corporate Guardian will appoint an Voluntary Administrator who will arrange a proposal to creditors for payment of your company’s debts.

Are you looking for a way to save your company?

Don’t ignore your company debts. Doing nothing and hoping you can trade out of your current financial situation is not worth the risk.

Corporate Guardian can guarantee you that when you go into voluntary administration, we have the experience and expertise to make this process stress free and as seamless as possible. Our team of in-house advisors, lawyers and insolvency practitioners have dealt with many similar circumstances and will provide you with the support you need through this time.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Voluntary Administration?

Voluntary administration is an insolvency procedure where the directors of a financially troubled company appoint an external administrator.

The voluntary administration process ensures that the business, property and affairs of the company are administered in a way that:

  • Maximises the chances of a business to continue to exist, or:
  • Results in a better return for the company’s creditors and members, than from an immediate winding up of the company (section 435A).

The administration process takes place over an interim period, usually lasting between 25 and 30 business days.

Why choose Voluntary Administration?

A voluntary administration provides a flexible procedure, enabling a company time to compromise an arrangement with its creditors, which may save the company, the business and jobs while maximising the return to creditors. It can:

  • Provide a company with breathing space to deal with creditors in an orderly manner and prepare proposal to give the best return to stakeholders
  • Allows an independent party to review the company’s affairs and deal with the pressures of creditors
  • Reduce the possibility of secured creditor proceedings against the assets of the company
  • It may allow the company to stay out of liquidation

If the voluntary administration attempt fails, the legislation facilitates the winding-up of the company.

How do you begin?

A voluntary administration begins when an appointment document is executed by either:

(a) the directors,

(b) a liquidator, or

(c) a secured creditor.

and the administrator consents to the appointment.

What are the advantages?

Voluntary Administration offers a range of significant advantages:

Continue trading

When you place your company into a VA, your company is given the opportunity to restructure itself as it works to settle its debts, enabling it to continue to trade into the future.

Reduce debt

You as the director, will be provided with an opportunity to put forward a proposal to the company’s unsecured creditors. It is sometimes possible to settle the company’s debts for less than the original amount. This is known as a Deed of Company Arrangement (DOCA).

You regain control of your company

A Voluntary Administration comes to an end once the company’s creditors either approve a Deed of Company Arrangement; vote to hand the control of the company back to the directors; or, in some circumstances, decide that the struggling company is unable to continue trading and vote to place it into liquidation.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Voluntary Administration?

Voluntary administration is an insolvency procedure where the directors of a financially troubled company appoint an external administrator.

The voluntary administration process ensures that the business, property and affairs of the company are administered in a way that:

  • Maximises the chances of a business to continue to exist, or:
  • Results in a better return for the company’s creditors and members, than from an immediate winding up of the company (section 435A).

The administration process takes place over an interim period, usually lasting between 25 and 30 business days.

Why choose Voluntary Administration?

A voluntary administration provides a flexible procedure, enabling a company time to compromise an arrangement with its creditors, which may save the company, the business and jobs while maximising the return to creditors. It can:

  • Provide a company with breathing space to deal with creditors in an orderly manner and prepare proposal to give the best return to stakeholders
  • Allows an independent party to review the company’s affairs and deal with the pressures of creditors
  • Reduce the possibility of secured creditor proceedings against the assets of the company
  • It may allow the company to stay out of liquidation

If the voluntary administration attempt fails, the legislation facilitates the winding-up of the company.

How do you begin?

A voluntary administration begins when an appointment document is executed by either:

(a) the directors,

(b) a liquidator, or

(c) a secured creditor.

and the administrator consents to the appointment.

What are the advantages?

Voluntary Administration offers a range of significant advantages:

Continue trading

When you place your company into a VA, your company is given the opportunity to restructure itself as it works to settle its debts, enabling it to continue to trade into the future.

Reduce debt

You as the director, will be provided with an opportunity to put forward a proposal to the company’s unsecured creditors. It is sometimes possible to settle the company’s debts for less than the original amount. This is known as a Deed of Company Arrangement (DOCA).

You regain control of your company

A Voluntary Administration comes to an end once the company’s creditors either approve a Deed of Company Arrangement; vote to hand the control of the company back to the directors; or, in some circumstances, decide that the struggling company is unable to continue trading and vote to place it into liquidation.